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Burkina Faso – REVS+ fights for access to treatment and car for HIV-positive people

– BURKINA FASO –
REVS+ FIGHTS FOR ACCESS TO TREATMENT AND CARE
FOR HIV-POSITIVE PEOPLE
February 18th, 2013

Gestion médicament REV+In Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso’s second largest city, the REVS+ organization (Responsabilité – Espoir – Vie – Solidarité +) has been advocating for access to care and treatment for HIV-positive people for 15 years. A member of Coalition PLUS, this community-based HIV/AIDS organization was the first in the country to engage in preventing mother-to-child transmission, and hundreds of pregnant, HIV-positive women are currently receiving psychological, medical and social support. For now, these women are giving birth at the Bobo-Dioulasso pediatric hospital, but within a few months they are expected to be able to be followed throughout their pregnancy and after delivery directly at the organization thanks to the Grandir program, which also provides sanitary and psychosocial support for 850 children, 200 of whom are HIV-positive.

In spite of the many targeted prevention campaigns run by REVS+, focused mainly on the importance of screening, physicians working with the organization see people arrive for consultations in an extremely weakened state. Many of them, screened very late, suffer from multiple opportunistic diseases. Their immunity is so low that they need to begin treatment without delay. Unfortunately, in Burkina Faso, there’s a long wait to receive triple therapy. Too often, patients waiting for treatment must wait for funds to be freed up, or for another patient to either die or stop treatment. This explains why in 2011, of the 3426 HIV-positive people followed at the organization, the vast majority of whom required treatment, only 37% were able to receive triple therapy. In Burkina Faso, access to treatment and care for HIV-positive people is a constant challenge – one that REVS+ is more ready and determined than ever to take on, thanks to your critical support.

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