Ending HIV: The strategy

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ENDING HIV: THE STRATEGY
September 15th, 2014

victoireOf the 35 million people living with HIV today, an estimated 19 million don’t know that they are HIV-positive.

Upon the publication of the UNAIDS Gap Report on July 16, Michel Sidibé declared that, “if we accelerate all HIV scale-up by 2020, we will be on track to end the epidemic by 2030.”

On the margins of the 20th International AIDS Conference, he appealed to the international community to set new treatment goals for 2020:

  • 90% of all people living with HIV should know their HIV status
  • 90% of all people diagnosed with HIV should be receiving HIV treatments 
  • 90% of all people being treated for HIV should achieve lasting viral suppression 

Experts have clearly identified the priorities: close the gap between the number of people who know their HIV status and those who don’t, and between the number of people who receive HIV services and those who don’t.

While applauding the considerable efforts being made to improve access to treatment, the Gap Report also stresses the critical importance of the commitment of the international community, and that of the countries most affected by HIV/AIDS.
It puts particular emphasis on the need to address multiple complex micro-epidemics with specific, tailored solutions, so that people can be reached faster and with better services.

The report also specifies that equal access to quality HIV services will be imperative, both for human rights and public health reasons.

For this to be possible, we must first remedy the lack of data on the people most affected by HIV, combat stigmatization, discrimination, repressive laws, and any obstacles to collective mobilization, and increase funding.
It is estimated that an annual amount of $22-24 billion would be needed to completely fund an effective anti-HIV program.

By putting an end to the epidemic by 2030, we would avoid 18 million new HIV infections, and 11.2 million AIDS-related deaths.

From fiction to reality

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FROM FICTION TO REALITY
September 15th, 2014

Did this projected news story from 2030 sound appealing? After fighting HIV for 50 years, this would be a perfect ending to one of the most murderous epidemics in history.

But did you know that this fictional story might not be so far-fetched? Or at least, that’s the hope of UNAIDS Executive Director Michel Sidibé.

WITHIN JUST 15 YEARS, WE COULD LIVE IN A WORLD WITHOUT HIV.
WITH YOU AT OUR SIDE, WE CAN TURN HOPE INTO REALITY!
hope

2030: A world without HIV

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2030: A world without HIV

HIV/AIDS: FINALLY, THE EPIDEMIC HAS BEEN ERADICATED!
September 15th, 2014

aidsAs 2030 draws to a close, the latest World Health Organization (WHO) statistics on HIV/AIDS speak for themselves; there have been no new transmissions in the past 24 months!

This is an unprecedented triumph for the entire international community. Prevention, testing, and treatment objectives were all reached thanks to an impressive feat of mobilization by countless players in the fight against HIV.

The most recent UNAIDS report gives particular praise to the synergy between scientific and medical advances, and those in human rights, throughout all five decades of the pandemic.

Additionally, over the past 15 years in particular, the commitment and support of policy-makers worldwide have ensured that the fight against HIV had every necessary resource.

It was a sizeable challenge: ensuring that the people at the highest risk of transmission would benefit from crucial healthcare services. To achieve this,concerted action was needed on all fronts: information and awareness campaigns, targeted prevention campaigns, and increased access to testing, care, and treatment. Equally important was the fight for human rights and against discrimination, criminalization, etc.

None of this would have been possible without the incredible support of donors around the world. Through their contributions to various foundations, they helped fund numerous advances in the fight against HIV, both scientifically and by directly supporting the communities most affected by the pandemic.

Although the infection still has no cure, experts now agree that we can safely refer to the HIV/AIDS epidemic as a thing of the past.